Chief Pontiac and the Siege of Detroit, French and Indian Wars Benson J Lossing

ISBN:

Published: November 14th 2012

Kindle Edition

40 pages


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Chief Pontiac and the Siege of Detroit, French and Indian Wars  by  Benson J Lossing

Chief Pontiac and the Siege of Detroit, French and Indian Wars by Benson J Lossing
November 14th 2012 | Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, ZIP | 40 pages | ISBN: | 10.15 Mb

Kindle version of vintage magazine article originally published in 1861. Contains lots of great info and illustrations seldom seen in the last 160 years.Read excerpt -The next morning a pouring rain set in, and continued all day- and the Indians didMoreKindle version of vintage magazine article originally published in 1861. Contains lots of great info and illustrations seldom seen in the last 160 years.Read excerpt -The next morning a pouring rain set in, and continued all day- and the Indians did not make their appearance, though the garrison was kept under arms, and every preparation made to prevent a surprise.

Toward evening it cleared up- the broken clouds drifted away before the brisk west wind, and the sun sunk in a blaze of glory behind the western forest, its last beams glancing on the British colors that fluttered from the flag-staff. Twilight soon deepened into the full shadows of night, and darkness fell on forest and stream.

Gladwyn, whose fears had now become thoroughly aroused, would not retire to his quarters but walked the ramparts all night. The scene, the time, and the imminent danger combined to render him sad and thoughtful. War was evidently determined upon by Pontiac, and he was unprepared for it. He was there in the heart of the wilderness, far removed from succor, with only a hundred and twenty men in a fort presenting but feeble defenses to a determined foe.

He contrasted the quiet scene before him with the aspect it would present in a few days. Now all was tranquil and serene. The river flowed by with a low monotonous sound, reflecting the stars in its bosom- and the great forest slept black and motionless against the sky. Before morning that stream might swarm with hostile boats, and those silent woods resound with maddened yells and fierce shouts of vengeance. But the night passed on without disturbance, save now and then there arose the loud roll of the Indian drum in the distance, accompanied by bursts of yells as the Indians danced around their camp fires that reddened the heavens far and near with their glow.When the welcome light of morning broke over the forest all was bustle and commotion within the fort.

The sun rose bright and clear- but a heavy mist lay along the river, entirely shrouding it from view. At length the heavy folds began to move and lift, and finally parted and floated gracefully away on the morning air, revealing the water covered with bark canoes moving steadily across the river. Only two or three warriors appeared in each- the others lying flat on their faces on the bottom, to avoid being seen.

Pontiac had ordered this to be done, so as not to awaken any suspicions in the garrison that his mission was not what he represented it to be—a peaceful one. He could not leave them behind, for he would need them in the approaching conflict. There was a large common behind the fort- this was soon filled with a crowd of Indians—squaws, children, and warriors mingled together—some naked, some dressed in fantastic costumes, or gaudily painted, and all apparently preparing for a game of ball.

Pontiac slowly approached the fort, with sixty chiefs at his back, marching in Indian file. Each was wrapped to the chin in his blanket, underneath which, grasped with his right hand, lay concealed his trusty rifle. From the heads of some waved the hawk, the eagle, and raven plume. Others showed only the scalp-lock, while a few wore their hair naturally—the long dark locks hanging wildly about their malignant faces.As Pontiac passed through the gate of the fort he uttered a low ejaculation of surprise.

Well might he do so- for the unexpected sight that met his gaze would have startled a greater stoic even than he. Instead of beholding the garrison lulled into security, and entirely off its guard, he found himself between two lines of glittering steel, drawn up on each side of the gate to receive him. The houses of the traders and those employed by the garrison were all closed, and the occupants armed to the teeth, standing on guard upon the corners of the streets- while the tap of the drum, heard at intervals, told in language that Pontiac coul



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